Search
Advertisement
emedsol
Advertisement
Shanghai East Hospital
Advertisement
Renji Hospital
Advertisement
Ciming
Advertisement
aier
Advertisement
medical travel
Tumor Therapy China

Excellence for methods of Traditional Chinese Medicine

TCM is defined as a medical science governing the theory and practice of traditional Chinese medicine. It includes Chinese medication, pharmacology/herbalogy, acupuncture, massage and Qigong. The following methods are considered to be part of Chinese medicine.

Acupuncture(针疗/針療)

(from the Latin word acus, "needle", and pungere, meaning "prick") is a technique in which the practitioner inserts fine needles into specific points on the patient's body. Usually about a dozen acupoints are needled in one session, although the number of needles used may range anywhere from just one or two to 20 or more. The intended effect is to increase circulation and balance energy (Qi) within the body.

Acupuncture

Moxibustion

"Moxa," often used in conjunction with acupuncture, consists in burning of dried Chinese mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) on acupoints. "Direct Moxa" involves the pinching of clumps of the herb into cones that are placed on acupoints and lit until warm. Typically the burning cone is removed before burning the skin and is thought, after repeated use, to warm the body and increase circulation. Moxa can also be rolled into a cigar-shaped tube, lit, and held over an acupuncture point, or rolled into a ball and stuck onto the back end of an inserted needle for warming effect.

Moxibustion

Chinese food therapy (食疗/食療)

Chinese food therapy (食疗/食療) It is a practice of healing using natural foods instead of medications. Dietary recommendations are usually made according to the patient's individual condition in relation to TCM theory. The "five flavors" (an important aspect of Chinese herbalism as well) indicate what function various types of food play in the body. A balanced diet, which leads to health, is when the five functional flavors are in balance. When one is diseased (and therefore unbalanced), certain foods and herbs are prescribed to restore balance to the body.

The following is a list of common food classifications:

rough translation related symptoms/effects examples cures
dry fire (yang) causes dryness of skin, chapped lips, nose bleed etc. chili pepper, deep fried food, beef jerky, lychee. any yin or cooling food
wet heat (yang) causes mouth sore, urinary burning etc. probably due to the acidity or alkalinity. mango, pineapple, cherry. chrysanthemum, sugar cane (竹蔗), Imperata arundinacea (茅根), Prunella vulgaris L. (夏枯草)
cold cooling (yin) causes dizziness, weakness, pale or green face (low oxygen level in blood) etc. watermelon, cantelope, honeydew and certain kinds of melon-type fruits or vegetables, green tea. any boosting or dry fire food
blocking cause indigestion, stomach gas etc. all fibrous food, e.g. yam, chestnuts. haw (fruit 山楂), malt (麥芽)
poisoning causes pus or swelling in wound, outbreak of acnes, hemorrhoid etc. duck, goose, bamboo shoot, all shellfish. abstinence at outbreak
greasy causes gastric upset, runny stool, outbreak of acnes etc. all greasy food, e.g. bacon etc. abstinence at outbreak.
clear cooling mild yin type that counteract the dry fire type. Also listed as yin when overused. beer, lettuce, sugar cane (竹蔗), Imperata arundinacea (茅根), American ginseng. not needed if not overused
nourishing moisturizing, soothing apple, pear, fig, winter melon, longan, 淮山, lotus seed, lily bulb etc. not needed
boosting replenishes blood and Qi. Also listed as dry fire when overused. Mutton, snake, wild games, beef, red dates (紅棗). not needed if not overused
vigorating circulating blood and Qi. red wine, Korean ginseng. not needed
generating, strengthening improves various internal functions various not needed

Chinese herbal medicine

Chinese herbal medicine In China, herbal medicine is considered as the primary therapeutic modality of internal medicine. Of the approximately 500 Chinese herbs that are in use today, 250 or so are very commonly used. Rather than being prescribed individually, single herbs are combined into formulas that are designed to adapt to the specific needs of individual patients. A herbal formula can contain anywhere from 3 to 25 herbs. As with diet therapy, each herb has one or more of the five flavors/functions and one of five "temperatures" ("Qi") (hot, warm, neutral, cool, cold). After the herbalist determines the energetic temperature and functional state of the patient's body, he or she prescribes a mixture of herbs tailored to balance disharmony. One classic example of Chinese herbal medicine is the use of various mushrooms, like reishi and shiitake, which are currently under intense study by ethnobotanists and medical researchers for immune system enhancement. Unlike Western herbalism, Chinese herbal medicine uses many animal, mineral and mineraloid remedies, and also uses more products from marine sources.

Chinese herbal medicine

Fire Cupping (拔罐)

A type of Chinese massage, cupping consists of placing several glass "cups" (open spheres) on the body. A match is lit and placed inside the cup and then removed before placing the cup against the skin. As the air in the cup is heated, it expands, and after placing in the skin, cools down, creating a lower pressure inside the cup that allows the cup to stick to the skin via suction. When combined with massage oil, the cups can be slid around the back, offering what some practitioners think of as a reverse-pressure massage.

Fire Cupping (拔罐)

Tai chi chuan

It is an internal Chinese martial art practiced for both its defense training and its health benefits. It is also typically practiced for a variety of other personal reasons: its hard and soft martial art technique, demonstration competitions, and longevity. As a consequence, a multitude of training forms exist, both traditional and modern, which correspond to those aims. Some of tai chi chuan's training forms are especially known for being practiced at what most people categorize as slow movement. Today, tai chi has spread worldwide.

Tai chi chuan

Tui na (推拿) massage

A hands-on body treatment that uses Chinese taoist and martial art principles to bring the body to balance. The principles being balanced are the eight principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The practitioner may brush, knead, roll/press and rub the areas between each of the joints (known as the eight gates) to open the body's defensive (wei) chi and get the energy moving in both the meridians and the muscles. The practitioner can then use range of motion, traction, massage, with the stimulation of acupressure points and to treat both acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions, as well as many non-musculoskeletal conditions

Tui na (推拿) massage
Tui na (推拿) massage